I whole-heartedly support the idea of a cookie for breakfast.  Or a slice of pie.  Or a small sliver of chocolate cake.  You have the rest of the day to pile your plate with veggies.  Let’s make sure those first few moments of the day are good ones.  Sweet ones.

I have an unusual predilection for eating on-the-go.  It’s strange because I am so rarely on-the-go or in a rush.  Truth be told, I have all the time in the world for most things.  I leisurely wake up before my alarm each morning, wander out to the garden to touch my seedlings (it makes their stems stronger, truly), then come back in to boil some water for tea and enjoy the sunrise.

Part of the reason I feel so comfortable in my house (or my ‘nest’ as my friends and family call it) is that it faces East.  Every sunrise feels like a show put on just for me.

After pondering which tea I might like to sip this morning, I slowly wash my face and get ready for work.  I check my email and before I know it, it’s time to go to work!  Where did the morning go?!  I secretly enjoy that panicked moment—like I’m some sort of important business woman that is running late for a meeting.  The only thing waiting for me at work is more plants.  I spend my days nurturing other people’s plants and missing my own the way teachers nurture other people’s children and yearn to be home with their own.

I love to grab a quick breakfast and eat in the car.  I even like to sip the last of my tea out of the original mug in the car—I don’t have time for to-go cups!  I’m going to be late!  There’s a bus stop on County Road 27 and I judge how late I am by the state of the bus:  Is it idling and waiting for the exact time to open the doors?  Or, is she long gone, slowly loping down the road with a load of kiddos?  I can’t fake the feeling of being in a rush for long, because if I get stuck behind the bus, I don’t mind a bit.  On either side of our resting place is an alfalfa field with dancing yellow butterflies (they’re actually pests, but beautiful pests) and a corn field drying down.  If you’ve never spent time in a corn field, let me warn you, a corn field is full of bizarre air movement.  On a completely still day you will see leaves moving as if there’s a gust of wind that only they can feel.  In my garden, sometimes the top leaves of the corn spin wildly as the sun goes down as if they’re protesting the fading light.  It’s a strange sensation to watch so much motion when there is no affect on your own skin.

I call these breakfast cookies because they are made of whole grains and use only honey for sweetness.  They are delicious any time of day, although I think they taste best when eaten with a false sense of urgency…while watching yellow butterflies and corn stalks sway, but I couldn’t exactly put that in my recipe, now could I?

Sesame Date Breakfast Cookies

Sesame Date Breakfast Cookies

Makes 6-8 cookies.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons whole wheat pastry flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 1 tablespoons canola (or grapeseed) oil
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1 large egg white
  • 3 large juicy Medjool dates, chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/3 cup rolled oats
  • 2 tablespoons sesame seeds

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 and line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a silicone mat.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda and cinnamon. Set aside.
  3. In a medium bowl, stir together with a spatula the butter and honey. Once the mixture is thoroughly combined, add the egg white and oil and stir vigorously. Add the chopped dates and vanilla.
  4. Add the dry ingredients to the wet and sprinke over the rolled oats. Fold together without over-mixing.
  5. Scoop 2-3 tablespoons of dough for each cookie and place on a cookie sheet. Then, with damp fingers, press the cookies out flat and sprinkle sesame seeds on each cookie.
  6. Bake for 14-16 minutes, rotating the sheet half-way through. They should be golden brown and puffed when they are done. Let cool slightly before moving to a cooling rack and serving.